Living in Chinatown Honolulu
November 29, 2003
 


Lobbied heavily by pharmaceutical companies,

the Republican leadership decided not to allow Medicare to use its buying
power to negotiate lower prices with drug companies. It's something that
huge private insurers and companies (such as Sam's Club) do every day. But
Medicare won't be allowed to do it, virtually guaranteeing that prices for
prescriptions drugs -- already high -- will soar.


The bill pays
private insurance companies to take elderly patients. You know how one
of the tenets of conservative philosophy is that private companies can always
deliver a product better and cheaper? So why does the Medicare bill offer
billions in subsidies to private insurers to induce them into the market?
That's not competition; that's corporate welfare.




US Iraq occupation criticised in army report



28/11/2003
- 06:28:21
American military commanders did not impose curfews, halt looting or
order Iraqis back to work after Saddam Hussein’s regime fell because US
policymakers were reluctant to declare American troops an occupying force,
according an internal Army review
"At first, the people were anxious to get started and looked
to the US for assistance. They soon saw us as being unable or unwilling to get anything done,” the report says.



Jackson's lawsuit: Ugly details have emerged
of the home life of the boy, a 12-year-old cancer sufferer. His family pursued two abuse-related lawsuits in the past, once winning more than $137,000 in damages.



Professor William Rees,
disagreed that humans were abnormal. "I would use the term 'unusual' instead," he said.

November 27, 2003
 
http://www.ptosis.netfirms.com/TuDuDetail.jpg
In Tu Du Hospital

, southeast Asia's largest obstetrics hospital, five gallon jars are filled
with stillborn or aborted fetuses. According to the Vietnamese medical authorities,
each fetus is a victim of dioxin poisoning from Agent Orange. As many as
ten pairs of Siamese twins are born here each year. where as one case every
ten to 15 years would be normal. P.81 "Hush Hush, The dark
secrets of scientific research". Michael Jordan 363.11 Jo 779790 HSL 1812360020
2003 Quintet Publishing Q162.J67 2003 C2002-905271-8 ISBN 1-55297-607-6
ISBN 1-55297-608-4 (pbk) 5090210Q172.5E77.J67 Toronto Canada Firefly Books




Detail of Page 81, Page
81







Siamese twins

connected at different parts of their bodies, children with horribly misshapen
heads and twisted bodies, others barely recognizable as human beings. They
were being saved as a record of the genetic defects presumably from the American
Agent Orange used
in Vietnam.









Agent Orange... Toxic Chemical Assault on People

Large glass jars containing true monstrosities. Nearly every hospital in
Vietnam has a similar museum of horrors.




Agent Orange

is a mixture of 2 major compounds- 2,4-dicholorophenoxyacetic acid and 2,4,5-tricholorophenoxyacetic
acid. By mimicking a natural plant growth hormone, auxin, these herbicides
are able to induce plants to grow themselves past their natural levels of
sustainability.


An 1987
study found that 30% of the 17,000 babies delivered at the hospital were
either difficult of premature (3). The comparative rates of all south Vietnam
is 10% and for the whole country, it is 8%.



Among
the leading manufacturers of Agent Orange for the Vietnam war effort was
Monsanto




Monsanto Corporation Criminal Investigation Cover-up of Dioxin





Fears grow with genetic crop secrecy - The Honolulu Advertiser -


Monsanto Co

http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/dailypix/2003/Oct/19/ln01a3.jpg



.
Amazing is the speed and ea

se with which companies have gained approval to bring on such mammoth changes
in production systems and industry structure, changes that are bound to have
all sorts of major economic and environmental consequences no one can predict,
and which no one is really watching.



The Hawaii Agriculture Research Center

in 'Aiea is testing sugar cane crossed with human genes to try to generate
an enzyme that will produce bone marrow.











President Bush, I don't get it, you're against stem cell research yet allow
defilement of humans, a

blasphemy
against the image of God that is mankind.





Please stop mixing human genes into other things.

Please put into law FrankenFoods labeling. The fish-gene strawberrys don't
taste sweet.



Mahalo.







I'm being experimented on without my consent.







November 24, 2003
 

This poem is one of three inspirations for S. King's "The Dark Tower"
series No Spoilers Here

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Robert Browning (1812-1889)http://www.victorianweb.org/icons2/authors/browning.jpg




"Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came"







(See Edgar's song in Shakespeare's King Lear.)






1

My first thought was, he lied in every word,


2 That hoary cripple, with malicious
eye


3 Askance to watch the working of his
lie


4 On mine, and mouth scarce able to afford


5 Suppression of the glee that pursed and
scored


6 Its edge, at one more victim gained
thereby.





7 What else should he be set for, with his
staff?


8 What, save to waylay with his lies,
ensnare


9 All travellers who might find him posted
there,


10 And ask the road? I guessed what skull-like
laugh


11 Would break, what crutch 'gin write my epitaph


12 For pastime in the dusty thoroughfare,





13 If at his counsel I should turn aside


14 Into that ominous tract which, all agree,


15 Hides the Dark Tower. Yet acquiescingly


16 I did turn as he pointed: neither pride


17 Nor hope rekindling at the end descried,


18 So much as gladness that some end might
be.





19 For, what with my whole world-wide wandering,


20 What with my search drawn out thro'
years, my hope


21 Dwindled into a ghost not fit to cope


22 With that obstreperous joy success would
bring,


23 I hardly tried now to rebuke the spring


24 My heart made, finding failure in its
scope.





25 As when a sick man very near to death


26 Seems dead indeed, and feels begin and
end


27 The tears and takes the farewell of
each friend,


28 And hears one bid the other go, draw breath


29 Freelier outside ("since all is o'er," he
saith,


30 "And the blow fallen no grieving can
amend";)





31 While some discuss if near the other graves


32 Be room enough for this, and when a
day


33 Suits best for carrying the corpse away,


34 With care about the banners, scarves and
staves:


35 And still the man hears all, and only craves


36 He may not shame such tender love and
stay.





37 Thus, I had so long suffered in this quest,


38 Heard failure prophesied so oft, been
writ


39 So many times among "The Band"--to wit,


40 The knights who to the Dark Tower's search
addressed


41 Their steps--that just to fail as they, seemed
best,


42 And all the doubt was now--should I
be fit?





43 So, quiet as despair, I turned from him,


44 That hateful cripple, out of his highway


45 Into the path he pointed. All the day


46 Had been a dreary one at best, and dim


47 Was settling to its close, yet shot one grim



48

Red leer to see the plain catch its estray.





49 For mark! no sooner was I fairly found


50 Pledged to the plain, after a pace or
two,


51 Than, pausing to throw backward a last
view


52 O'er the safe road, 'twas gone; grey plain
all round:


53 Nothing but plain to the horizon's bound.


54 I might go on; nought else remained
to do.





55 So, on I went. I think I never saw


56 Such starved ignoble nature; nothing
throve:


57 For flowers--as well expect a cedar
grove!


58 But cockle, spurge, according to their law


59 Might propagate their kind, with none to
awe,


60 You'd think; a burr had been a treasure-trove.





61 No! penury, inertness and grimace,


62 In some strange sort, were the land's
portion. "See


63 Or shut your eyes," said Nature peevishly,


64 "It nothing skills: I cannot help my case:


65 'Tis the Last Judgment's fire must cure this
place,



66

Calcine its clods and set my prisoners free."





67 If there pushed any ragged thistle-stalk



68

Above its mates, the head was chopped; the bents


69 Were jealous else. What made those holes
and rents



70

In the dock's harsh swarth leaves, bruised as to baulk


71 All hope of greenness? 'tis a brute must
walk



72

Pashing their life out, with a brute's intents.





73 As for the grass, it grew as scant as hair


74 In leprosy; thin dry blades pricked
the mud


75 Which underneath looked kneaded up with
blood.


76 One stiff blind horse, his every bone a-stare,


77 Stood stupefied, however he came there:


78 Thrust out past service from the devil's
stud!





79 Alive? he might be dead for aught I know,



80

With that red gaunt and colloped neck a-strain,


81 And shut eyes underneath the rusty mane;


82 Seldom went such grotesqueness with such
woe;


83 I never saw a brute I hated so;


84 He must be wicked to deserve such pain.





85 I shut my eyes and turned them on my heart.


86 As a man calls for wine before he fights,


87 I asked one draught of earlier, happier
sights,


88 Ere fitly I could hope to play my part.


89 Think first, fight afterwards--the soldier's
art:


90 One taste of the old time sets all to
rights.





91 Not it! I fancied Cuthbert's reddening face


92 Beneath its garniture of curly gold,


93 Dear fellow, till I almost felt him
fold


94 An arm in mine to fix me to the place


95 That way he used. Alas, one night's disgrace!


96 Out went my heart's new fire and left
it cold.





97 Giles then, the soul of honour--there he
stands


98 Frank as ten years ago when knighted
first.


99 What honest men should dare (he said)
he durst.


100 Good--but the scene shifts--faugh! what hangman
hands


101 In to his breast a parchment? His own bands


102 Read it. Poor traitor, spit upon and
curst!





103 Better this present than a past like that;


104 Back therefore to my darkening path again!


105 No sound, no sight as far as eye could
strain.


106 Will the night send a howlet or a bat?


107 I asked: when something on the dismal flat


108 Came to arrest my thoughts and change
their train.





109 A sudden little river crossed my path


110 As unexpected as a serpent comes.


111 No sluggish tide congenial to the glooms;


112 This, as it frothed by, might have been a
bath


113 For the fiend's glowing hoof--to see the wrath


114 Of its black eddy bespate with flakes
and spumes.





115 So petty yet so spiteful! All along


116 Low scrubby alders kneeled down over
it;


117 Drenched willows flung them headlong
in a fit


118 Of mute despair, a suicidal throng:


119 The river which had done them all the wrong,


120 Whate'er that was, rolled by, deterred
no whit.





121 Which, while I forded,--good saints, how I
feared


122 To set my foot upon a dead man's cheek,


123 Each step, or feel the spear I thrust
to seek


124 For hollows, tangled in his hair or beard!


125 --It may have been a water-rat I speared,


126 But, ugh! it sounded like a baby's shriek.





127 Glad was I when I reached the other bank.


128 Now for a better country. Vain presage!


129 Who were the strugglers, what war did
they wage,


130 Whose savage trample thus could pad the dank


131 Soil to a plash? Toads in a poisoned tank,


132 Or wild cats in a red-hot iron cage--





133 The fight must so have seemed in that fell
cirque.


134 What penned them there, with all the
plain to choose?


135 No foot-print leading to that horrid
mews,


136 None out of it. Mad brewage set to work


137 Their brains, no doubt, like galley-slaves
the Turk


138 Pits for his pastime, Christians against
Jews.





139 And more than that--a furlong on--why, there!


140 What bad use was that engine for, that
wheel,


141 Or brake, not wheel--that harrow fit
to reel


142 Men's bodies out like silk? with all the air


143 Of Tophet's tool, on earth left unaware,


144 Or brought to sharpen its rusty teeth
of steel.





145 Then came a bit of stubbed ground, once a
wood,


146 Next a marsh, it would seem, and now
mere earth


147 Desperate and done with; (so a fool finds
mirth,


148 Makes a thing and then mars it, till his mood


149 Changes and off he goes!) within a rood--


150 Bog, clay and rubble, sand and stark
black dearth.





151 Now blotches rankling, coloured gay and grim,


152 Now patches where some leanness of the
soil's


153 Broke into moss or substances like boils;


154 Then came some palsied oak, a cleft in him


155 Like a distorted mouth that splits its rim


156 Gaping at death, and dies while it recoils.





157 And just as far as ever from the end!


158 Nought in the distance but the evening,
nought


159 To point my footstep further! At the
thought,


160 A great black bird, Apollyon's bosom-friend,



161

Sailed past, nor beat his wide wing dragon-penned


162 That brushed my cap--perchance the guide
I sought.





163 For, looking up, aware I somehow grew,


164 'Spite of the dusk, the plain had given
place


165 All round to mountains--with such name
to grace


166 Mere ugly heights and heaps now stolen in
view.


167 How thus they had surprised me,--solve it,
you!


168 How to get from them was no clearer case.





169 Yet half I seemed to recognise some trick


170 Of mischief happened to me, God knows
when--


171 In a bad dream perhaps. Here ended, then,


172 Progress this way. When, in the very nick


173 Of giving up, one time more, came a click


174 As when a trap shuts--you're inside the
den!





175 Burningly it came on me all at once,


176 This was the place! those two hills on
the right,


177 Crouched like two bulls locked horn in
horn in fight;


178 While to the left, a tall scalped mountain
. . . Dunce,



179

Dotard, a-dozing at the very nonce,


180 After a life spent training for the sight!





181 What in the midst lay but the Tower itself?



182

The round squat turret, blind as the fool's heart


183 Built of brown stone, without a counterpart


184 In the whole world. The tempest's mocking
elf


185 Points to the shipman thus the unseen shelf


186 He strikes on, only when the timbers
start.





187 Not see? because of night perhaps?--why, day


188 Came back again for that! before it left,


189 The dying sunset kindled through a cleft:


190 The hills, like giants at a hunting, lay


191 Chin upon hand, to see the game at bay,--


192 "Now stab and end the creature--to the
heft!"





193 Not hear? when noise was everywhere! it tolled


194 Increasing like a bell. Names in my ears


195 Of all the lost adventurers my peers,--


196 How such a one was strong, and such was bold,


197 And such was fortunate, yet each of old


198 Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe
of years.





199 There they stood, ranged along the hillsides,
met


200 To view the last of me, a living frame


201 For one more picture! in a sheet of flame


202 I saw them and I knew them all. And yet



203

Dauntless the slug-horn to my lips I set,


204 And blew. "Childe Roland to the Dark
Tower came."


Notes



1
] The title of the poem, and in Browning's own account the source of the
theme, is spoken as a line of nonsense by the disguised Edgar in King Lear
(at the end of III, iv).
"Childe" indicates a candidate for knighthood, the medieval sense being
"a well-born youth."



48
] estray: a tame beast found wandering or without an owner.



66
] calcine: made friable by means of heat.



68
] bents: blades of stiff grass.



70
] as to: as if to.



72
] Pashing: smashing.



80
] colloped: ridged with lumps like collops of meat.



161
] dragon-penned: winged like a dragon.



179
] nonce: occasion.



182
] the fool's heart. "The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God"
(Psalm 14:1).


203
] slug-horn: usually explained as a corruption of slogan, used here by
Browning in the mistaken idea that it means a horn. Chatterton made this
mistake in his Battle of Hastings, II, 10: "Some caught a slughorne and
an onset wound." But there is the hyphenated word slug-horn , meaning a short
and ill-formed horn of some animal of the ox kind. It is possible that Browning
used the word in this sense. To have a misshapen horn hanging at the gate
would be in keeping with the other features of the poem.
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Marta Cobb '97 (English 73 1994)



In "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came," The narrative takes the
form of rhyming (abbaab) stanzas, resembling a ballad. Through the plaintive
song of the knight, Browning paints the picture of a deeply depressed personality.
According to the speaker, he will not reach his goal, the man who gave
him directions deceived him, and traps lie in his way. His fears, however,
fail to materialize. He does reach the tower, evidently the hermit did give
accurate instructions, and nothing deters him from his quest. His morbid
mind runs wild, imaging a stiff old horse as one of the "devil's stud" (l.78),
and picturing dead bodies choking the river as he wades across (l. 121-7).
Instead he only encounters a water-rat that shrieks as he spears it. Everything
he sees or thinks upon fills him with loathing or sorrow.



Despair and uncertainty play a major role in "Childe Roland." The knight
does not know where to turn. He travels alone, for his companions have
all failed in their quest. He cannot bear to look to the future because
he believes that he will never reach his destination. The bleakness of
his present surroundings horrifies him, so he tries to find refuge in happier
past:



I shut my eyes and turned them on my heart.
As a man calls for wine before fights,
I asked for one draught of earlier, happier sights,
Ere fitly I could play my part.
Think first, fight afterwards -- the soldier's art:
One taste of the old time sets all to rights. (ll.85-90)

Trying desperately to escape the present that threatens him from without,
he seeks to look into himself and remember brighter times. Perhaps some
pleasant memories, sipped and tasted like wine, can bring him a few drops
of solace and numb his anxiety. Then he can "play [his] part" and move onward.
His recollections of his former companions, however, rapidly turn bitter:

Giles then, the soul of honour -- there he stands
Frank as ten years ago when knighted first.
What honest man should dare (he said) he durst.
Good -- but the scene shifts -- faugh! what hangman-hands
Pin to his breast a parchment? His own bands
Read it. Poor traitor, spit upon and curst! (ll. 97-102.

Looking back does not help; it only serves to remind him how the past
became the terrible and lonely present. His old companions failed in one
way or the other, only he remains. Severed from his past, afraid of the
future, the bleakness consumes him from without and within. He can only
continue. Upon reaching his destination, the phantom memories of his comrades
surround him and "one moment knell[s] the woe of years" (l.198). They view
him for the last time, but he cannot go back. He must release the past
and move on, into the unknown future. Bringing his horn to his lips he blows
his slogan, announcing his intention to charge. Society moves forward into
an uncertain future through a shifting present, cut lose from the structure
and values that once held it together. Like the knight, they can only move
forward, for the past offers little solace.
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On
the way, Childe Roland

indirectly contemplates the worthiness of the endeavor, when weighed against
his survival. In his friends, he finds those who succumbed to the temptation
of immediate gratification. He decides that the choice has already been
made as to his fate, and that he must not turn away from it. Thus, as the
poem concludes, despite the ghosts of all of those that he has known who
have fought and lost that he can see, Childe Roland calls out the phrase
which defines the purpose of his life: "Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came."
(line 204) Whether he dies or not has no relevance, and fittingly, that
information remains omitted. However, the important message remains. Browning
stresses in this poem that one should face danger and accept difficulty in
the name of duty. The theme of the self versus the other appears again,
with duty to society as the other. The fantastic aspects of the poem heighten
the importance of this idea, by setting the tone of that decision more effectively
than would a realistic depiction. Instead of exploring the effects of a
decision to sacrifice oneself for another, the poem looks at the way one
formulates the decision to make that sacrifice.



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The
Dark Tower theme


The poem was written by Robert Browning and he took the title from
Shakespeare's King Lear, from the scene on the heath when Edgar, in his
guise as poor Tom the fool, talks aimlessly of Childe Roland coming to
a dark tower. Going back further, Childe Roland was one of Charlemagne's
knights. Going forward, Browning’s poem is the inspiration for Stephen
King’s Dark Tower Trilogy. Stevie wrote a poem called Childe Rolandine.
I thought it might be interesting to compare Browning’s ‘Child Roland to
the Dark Tower Came’ with Stevie’s ‘Childe Rolandine’.




Browning’s poem tells the story of a knight who sets off towards a
fearful
Dark Tower

. The knight is inured to failure, nearly dead from exhaustion, thinks
it best to die, to fail, and then, puzzlingly, wonders if he is fit ( for
death for failure, who is not fit? ). He wanders through this desolate
landscape, crosses a wrathful river full of corpses, over land marked by
brutal battles, sees nothing alive but a devilishly grotesque horse and
a black, dragon winged bird. Dreadful mountains appear, and he realises
he has reached the Dark Tower. Dauntless, in the face of a terrible vision
of the lost dead seen in a sheet of flame, he blows a horn to signal his
arrival at the Dark Tower, a signal that traditionally invites the occupant
of a castle to come and do battle.




Is this a debunking of the myth of the quest, for this hero does
not achieve anything and it seems impossible that he will survive? Is it
about the despair of being without belief in God, a nightmare. t




P
J Steyer

writes on the Victorian Web : Browning himself agreed with the statement
that the poem's meaning could be expressed in "He that endureth to the
end shall be saved," though critics have claimed that the meaning could
be either one of defiance and courage or despair (Norton 1206). I contend
that it is both. ... His glory is perseverance in the midst of hopelessness,
... endurance through pain and temptation.



Browning also wrote that the Dark Tower was, "about the development
of a soul, little else is worth study."



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The Song of Roland





Charlemagne's greatest knight,
Roland the mighty, was betrayed by his squire and slain.



A medieval French epic

called La Chanson de Roland or Song of Roland (c.1100). This is one monster
of a poem, consisting of over 4,000 ten-syllable lines. Before he dies, Roland
blows his horn to recall Charlemagne, who then returns and wipes out the
remaining Saracens. More fighting...yadda, yadda, yadda...victory. Charlemagne
punishes Ganelon. Roland's fiance, Aude, dies from grief

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Fee, fi,
fo, fum,


I smell the blood of a Christian man,
Be he dead, be he living, with my brand,
I'll dash his brains from his brain-pan.'

And then the folding
doors of the hall were burst open, and the King of Elfland rushed
in.


'Strike then, Bogle, if thou darest,'
shouted out Childe Rowland, and rushed to meet him with his
good brand that never did fail. They fought, and they fought,
and they fought, till Childe Rowland beat the King of Elfland
down on to his knees, and caused him to yield and beg for
mercy. 'I grant thee mercy,' said Childe Rowland; 'release
my sister from thy spells and raise my brothers to life, and
let us all go free, and thou shalt be spared.' 'I agree,' said
the Elfin King, and rising up he went to a chest from which he
took a phial filled with a blood-red liquor. With this he
anointed the ears, eyelids, nostrils, lips, and finger-tips
of the two brothers, and they sprang at once into life, and
declared that their souls had been away, but had now returned.
The Elfin King then said some words to Burd Ellen, and she
was disenchanted, and they all four passed out of the hall,
through the long passage, and turned their backs on the Dark
Tower, never to return again.

The climax
of this epic poem

comes when the righteous troops at the historic Battle of Roncevaux
in 778 AD are attacked by the Saracens of Northern Spain. A furious
struggle ensues as Charlemagne's rearguard, under the command of
Knight Roland, the nephew of Charlemagne, struggles to ward off
the attackers. Roland, his top warriors, and the entire rearguard
are killed.


The Song of Roland

ignores some history, Roland, instead of being "Lord of the Breton March,"
is a Frankish lord and Charlemagne's own nephew. The "treachery" of the Christian
Basques becomes transformed into the trea chery of a single man, Ganelon,
and the Basques themselves are replaced by Moslems.



It is certain that


The Song of Roland

was not born in 1095—Roland was a celebrated individual before the
first crusade. But the song was written down at this moment because the clerks
and the king were searching for a fitting form of propaganda.



Roland

, a courageous knight and Charlemagne's right-hand man, nominates his stepfather,
Ganelon. Ganelon is enraged, thinking that Roland has nominated him for this
dangerous mission in an attempt to be rid of him for good. Ganelon has long
been jealous of Roland, and on his diplomatic mission he plots with the pagans,
telling them that they could ambush Charlemagne's rearguard as Charlemagne
leaves Spain. Roland will undoubtedly lead the rearguard, and Ganelon promises
that with Roland dead Charlemagne will lose the will to fight.



When Charlemagne's

army was stretched out in a long column of march, Basques who had set their
ambush on the very top of one of the mountains, came rushing down on the
last part of the baggage train & rearguard and killed them to the last
man. In this battle died Roland, Lord of the Breton Marches.



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Disclaimer :
There's an interesting
little twist

on the tale to which you need to pay attention, if for some crazy reason
this review convinces you to go out and pick up a copy of book one -- hold
up a minute. It turns out King has recently re-written the entire first book
and expanded it by roughly twenty percent.


November 23, 2003
 
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The Dark Tower thus far. Caution! Spoilers abound!
DT VI: Song of Susannah - June 2004 DT VII: The Dark Tower - November 2004
Timeline
1958 IT George Denborough gets killed.
1943 - A five year old Odetta Holmes has a brick dropped on her head by Jack Mort. This event creates Detta Walker although Detta takes control only one or two times until 1959
1959 Aug 19 Jack Mort pushes Odetta Holmes in front of a subway train, both her legs are amputated. It is this event that causes Detta Walker to become more dominant
1960 Events of "The Low Men in Yellow Coats", the novella in "Hearts in Atlantis".
1964 Roland enters the mind of Detta Walker while she is shoplifting in Macy's department store and brings her into his world
1977 May 9 Jake is pushed in front of a large Cadillac and killed. Before he dies he sees the image of The Man in Black dressed as a priest. He believes that TMIB pushed him in front of the car. This man is actually Jack Mort dressed as a priest and not the man in black after all .Jake Chambers is being the first time of twice entering into the world of the Dark Tower. Roland enters the body of Jack Mort, prevents Jake from being killed and is sent to the Gunslinger's world instead. , and gets enough of the anti-biotic Keflex to save his own life (as well as more ammunition than he has ever seen before in his life.) In the process Jack Mort is killed by the same train that maimed Odetta Holmes
1977 May 31 Jake begins to believe that he is going insane due to the same split time-line that affects Roland. In one reality he died, in another he didn't. Jake fully remembers both and that is tearing him apart. Jake skips school and finds an empty lot that once contained an "artistic deli". In the lot he finds a silver key and a rose growing in the middle of a clump of purple grass (see the note for Roland's meeting with Walter.) The rose opens and within Jake sees thousands of stars. He also buys a book from a man named "Tower", in this book is a train that bears a remarkable similarity to Blaine the Mono. This similarity leads Jake to believe that Blaine runs from St. Louis, MO to Topeka, KS.
1977 June Jake meets Eddie in a dream and is told to go to "co-op city" and find the young Eddie and Henry Dean. By following them he can find the gateway to the Gunslinger's world, which is actually contained within an ancient house thought to be haunted. Henry tells Eddie that two kids from Norwood Street had been found there with their throats cut and all the blood drained from their bodies and their hair had turned white. Eddie and Henry call the house "The Mansion", but there is reason to believe that at one point in the past it may have been called "The Markey Academy". This house is a living guardian between universes and it comes alive to prevent Jake from passing through. Naturally it fails.
1985 IT Adrian Mellon is the first victim of the 1985 wave of Killings in Derry.
1986 Captain Trips kills 99.6% of earth’s population in another universe, as described in the original The Stand, as well as in Wizard and Glass. This seems to be the world of the original Stand rather than the un-cut edition because the newspaper reports that the date is June 24, 1986. Reagan is still president and Bush is still V.P.
1986 June 24 Last issue of Topeka Capital-Journal The last issue of the Topeka Capital-Journal was printed in the where that The Gunslinger's Party visits in Wizard and Glass
1987 Roland enters the 21 year old body of Eddie Dean and helps him get a load of drugs through customs, gains a passing familiarity with antibiotics (enough to stay alive until a permanent cure for the lobstrosity bite is found), and rescues Eddie from a bloody shoot-out
1992 Captain Trips Captain Trips kills 99.6% of earth’s population in one universe (The Stand: Complete & Uncut).
1999 Susannah [Mia] arrives in NYC.
Roland’s TimeLine
300 or 400 B.C. book 3 time - A civil war erupted in a land called Garlan or in a place even farther away called Porla. Ripples of anarchy and rebellion spread out from this initial outbreak and caused almost every kingdom to fall. Huge, well-organized and well-trained armies broke apart into disorganized bands of bandits called "Harriers".Civil war erupts in a land called Garlan and in an even further away place named Porla.
20 years B.C.. book 3 time Communication between Lud and River Crossing stops.

David Quick attacks Lud.

Eldred Jonas fails as a Gunslinger and is sent West with a broken leg by Fardo, Cort's father.

Roland and Cuthbert plan a night of mischief in a cemetery, but Alain won't do it for fear of offending the spirits. Cuthbert makes fun of him saying ghosts don't really exist.

Something [bad] happens one day while Cuthbert and Alain are setting off fireworks.

A cross-eyed man tries to cheat Cort at the annual Fair-Day Riddling Competition by stealing the answers to the riddles. Cort stabs him in the chest with a knife and no one wins the prize goose.

Roland and Cuthbert overhear Hax's plans to poison the water supply of a town called Farson in the name of "The Good Man ". Hax is hung for treason. Roland is 11 years old.

1 year after Hax Steven learns of Gabrielle and Marten's affair.

2 yrs after Hax #4 Sylvia Pittson (the preacher in Tull) takes a trip through Hambry.

3 yrs after Hax #1 Roland almost catches Gabrielle and Marten in the act (I.159). A revolt is occurring in the West and the world has already "moved on." Roland defeats Cort with his hawk, David, and becomes the youngest Gunslinger ever. Roland is 14 years old. Right after his win, Roland goes to town and sleeps with a woman, a whore, for the first time. The next morning Steven confronts Roland over the whore's bed. He chastises Roland for allowing himself to be manipulated by Marten. Steven says he has known about Gabrielle and Marten for two years. Roland, Cuthbert, and Alain are sent to a town called Hambry in the barony of Mejis for their own safety from "The Good Man" and his rebellion against the Affiliation.

Within the space of a month Rhea of the Coös spies Roland and his ka-tet approaching Hambry. The night Roland arrives in Hambry Rhea meets with Susan Delgado and tests her virginity. She says that Susan may not lie with Mayor Thorin until Reap Night, three months away.

Later that night Roland and Susan meet along a deserted pathway. Roland (known to Susan as Will Dearborn) says that civil war has broken out in the Northern and Western baronies in the name of John Farson, "The Good Man."

One month after Cort's defeat .The reader learns that "Will Dearborn," "Richard Stockworth," and "Arthur Heath" are really Roland, Alain, and Cuthbert. Roland is not quite 15 years old at this point.

One week after the bar fight Sheemie delivers flowers to Susan from Roland

Three weeks after the bar fight. Susan has a fight with her Aunt Cordelia and goes riding to cool off. She runs into Roland. They kiss passionately and vow never to see each other again.

Susan gives her virginity to Roland.

Susan tells Roland the story of Oedipus and he relates it to "the bloody triangle formed by his father, his mother, and Marten".
Walter comes to Seafront and palavers with Jonas about his progress with Farson's orders.

Roland and Cuthbert kill Rhea's pet snake..

Latigo, the man Jonas was waiting for (Walter was an unpleasent surprise) arrives with 100 of Farson's men. They plan to kill Roland and his ka-tet the day before the reaping festival.

3 months since Rhea examined Susan. The Demon Moon, marking the start of reaping, rises...but rises blood red in color. Reynolds kills Rimmer. Depape kills Mayor Thorin and frames the three boys for the murders. Susan is burned alive during the Reaping Day festivities along with Roland's unborn child. Cordelia comes to her senses as she hears Susan's screams and dies of a heart attack before the flames are out. Roland, in an emotional collapse from seeing Susan's death in the Wizard's Glass, is returned home to Gilead with Cuthbert and Alain.

1 day before arriving home.Roland wakes from his stupor and see all the events of the past three months played in the Grapefruit...including those events which happened outside his presence.

3 days after arriving home. Roland gazes into the ball and manages to prevent (delay) his father's assasination. Roland gives the ball to his father and receives his father's sandal(iron)wood grip pistols.

Roland commits a matricide.

Graduation ceremonies take place.

9 wks after the graduation ceremonies, Cort dies (possibly poisoned)

Sheemie followed Roland, Cuthbert, and Alain home from Hambry and continues with them as they set off on their quest for the Tower along with Jamie DeCurry.

They see Dennis and Thomas chasing after Flagg (Eyes of the Dragon)

1 yr after defeating Cort (4 yrs since Hax) The Downland Baronies become overrun by riot and civil war. Less than 1 yr after the boys leave Hambry

Reynolds and Coral Thorin are killed in a failed bank robbery in a town called Oakley.

2 yrs after Cort dies The civil war which destroys the Gunslingers begins.

3 yrs after Steven is killed. Walter delivers Marten to Roland. (I.213)

10 yrs after Hax dies. The land falls to "The Good Man" Less than 1 year later

The events of The Little Sisters of Eluria take place.

Twelve years pass. Roland buys a mule in Pricetown Walter arrives in Tull and resurrects Nort.

Roland kills everyone in Tull to save his own life

Three weeks since Tull We meet Roland in the desert. He has been chasing the man in black for two months. Roland meets Brown and Zoltan, the mule dies.

16 days after meeting Brown, Roland meets Jake at the waystation

12 yrs since Gilead fell, (22 yrs since Hax, 12 yrs since Eluria) “The Gunslinger” book tells us that it has been 12 years since the destruction of the Gunslingers. While under the mountains, Jake asks Roland about growing up. Roland tells him of his various coming of age experiences. He says that he "left a girl [Jenna] twelve years ago

Later that day, Roland catches Walter. Roland is 33 years old. (Symbolically important since Roland becomes Walter's apotheosis at the same age Christ achieves his own.)

100 yrs (or more) later Roland awakens after the long palaver, he has physically aged only 10 years.
In Book 3 Roland says that after the meeting, Walter had been dead at least 100 years or more.


The events of The Drawing of the Three take place.

A few weeks later Roland, Suannah, and Eddie kill Mir.

Jake's drawing takes place.

Four days later Roland's ka-tet meets and is joined by Oy.


They come to the remains of David Quick and his downed WWII fighter jet.


They pass through River Crossing and the George Washington Bridge.


The action within the city of Lud takes place.


Richard Fannin (Flagg, Marten?) calls the Tick-Tock man into his service.

The ka-tet hop on board Blaine the mono.

The riddling begins.

We learn that Jake is eleven years old.


It is mentioned that Cort may have known (been aware) of other worlds...he knew a riddle by Jonathan Swift and that he was known to hold palaver with the Manni.


Roland says that Cuthbert died talking, and he fears the same for Eddie.


Eddie beats Blaine in the riddling competition.


They leave Blaine (after he/it crashes) and begin following interstate 70 South-East from Topeka.


Roland tells the story of Susan Delgado.

They come to the emerald palace.

They confront Flagg, who vanishes before Roland can kill him.

Roland takes Eddie, Jake, and Susannah inside the Wizard's Grapefruit and they watch him kill his mother.

They awaken from the pink once again along the path of the beam.

Book#5 The Pedddler Moon appears. It is late Summer.

Book #5 Jake and Eddie go Todash and travel to the New York of May 31st, 1977. Jake runs into himself and they witness Balazar confront Calvin Tower at "The Manhattan Restaurant of the Mind".

Book #5 The rest of Wolves of the Calla takes place.

Book #6 SPOILER! Susannah [Mia] arrives in NYC of 1999 18 years (years in our world) since Roland crossed the desert. Patrick Danville dies saving the lives of two men.

"Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came" by Robert Browning (1812-1889) "Childe Roland" is a long narrative poem which tells the story of Roland, a knight in training, and his quest for the Dark Tower. King has said that "Childe Roland" was one of three factors that caused him to write The Dark Tower. The opening stanza of the poem is:

My first thought was, he lied in every word
That hoary cripple, with malicious eye
Askance to watch the working of his lie
On mine, and mouth scarce able to afford
Suppression of the glee that pursed and scored
Its edge, at one more victim gained thereby.

Hoary Cripple refers to Walter. The poem presents this person as a not quite evil, but rather meddling or mischievous person, who takes glee in causing trouble for others. During each of our encounters with Walter, King assigns him a special little personality quirk that constantly makes itself known — he titters. He has a very odd and peculiar laugh (and the smile of a dead man). Browning also pays unusual attention to the description of the hoary cripple's laugh and smile — the last three lines are devoted entirely to this detail. Another trait of this strange creature is his habit of lying to people just as Walter does to Roland for the first part of The Gunslinger and the Dark Man.

This poem is that it depicts the entire journey of Roland to the Dark Tower If King continues to draw inspiration from the poem, then maybe by studying the rest of it we can discover clues as to where King plans to take the story. At the end of the poem as Roland finally approaches the Tower he hears

Names in [his] ears of all the lost adventurers my peers

And along with the voices of his dead friends

There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met
to view the last of me, a living frame
For one more picture! in a sheet of flame
I saw them and I knew them all.

So, Roland will come to the Dark Tower and there waiting for him will be all of his dead friends and companions. However, unlike Browning's hero, Roland Deschain won't be able to set his slug-horn to his lips and announce victory. We learn in Wolves of the Calla that the Horn of Deschain was lost by Cuthbert at the battle of Jericho Hill.


 
"CHILDE ROLAND TO THE DARK TOWER CAME
by Robert Browning

(See Edgar's song in "LEAR")

I
My first thought was, he lied in every word,
That hoary cripple, with malicious eye
Askance to watch the workings of his lie
On mine, and mouth scarce able to afford
Suppression of the glee, that pursed and scored
Its edge, at one more victim gained thereby.

II
What else should he be set for, with his staff?
What, save to waylay with his lies, ensnare
All travellers who might find him posted there,
And ask the road? I guessed what skull-like laugh
Would break, what crutch 'gin write my epitaph
For pastime in the dusty thoroughfare.

III
If at his counsel I should turn aside
Into that ominous tract which, all agree,
Hides the Dark Tower. Yet acquiescingly
I did turn as he pointed, neither pride
Now hope rekindling at the end descried,
So much as gladness that some end might be.

IV
For, what with my whole world-wide wandering,
What with my search drawn out through years, my hope
Dwindled into a ghost not fit to cope
With that obstreperous joy success would bring,
I hardly tried now to rebuke the spring
My heart made, finding failure in its scope.

V
As when a sick man very near to death
Seems dead indeed, and feels begin and end
The tears and takes the farewell of each friend,
And hears one bit the other go, draw breath
Freelier outside, ('since all is o'er,' he saith
And the blow fallen no grieving can amend;')

VI
When some discuss if near the other graves
be room enough for this, and when a day
Suits best for carrying the corpse away,
With care about the banners, scarves and staves
And still the man hears all, and only craves
He may not shame such tender love and stay.

VII
Thus, I had so long suffered in this quest,
Heard failure prophesied so oft, been writ
So many times among 'The Band' to wit,
The knights who to the Dark Tower's search addressed
Their steps - that just to fail as they, seemed best,
And all the doubt was now - should I be fit?

VIII
So, quiet as despair I turned from him,
That hateful cripple, out of his highway
Into the path he pointed. All the day
Had been a dreary one at best, and dim
Was settling to its close, yet shot one grim
Red leer to see the plain catch its estray.

IX
For mark! No sooner was I fairly found
Pledged to the plain, after a pace or two,
Than, pausing to throw backwards a last view
O'er the safe road, 'twas gone; grey plain all round;
Nothing but plain to the horizon's bound.
I might go on, naught else remained to do.

X
So on I went. I think I never saw
Such starved ignoble nature; nothing throve:
For flowers - as well expect a cedar grove!
But cockle, spurge, according to their law
Might propagate their kind with none to awe,
You'd think; a burr had been a treasure trove.

XI
No! penury, inertness and grimace,
In some strange sort, were the land's portion. 'See
'Or shut your eyes,' said Nature peevishly,
'It nothing skills: I cannot help my case:
''Tis the Last Judgement's fire must cure this place
'Calcine its clods and set my prisoners free.'

XII
If there pushed any ragged thistle-stalk
Above its mates, the head was chopped, the bents
Were jealous else. What made those holes and rents
In the dock's harsh swarth leaves, bruised as to baulk
All hope of greenness? Tis a brute must walk
Pashing their life out, with a brute's intents.

XIII
As for the grass, it grew as scant as hair
In leprosy; thin dry blades pricked the mud
Which underneath looked kneaded up with blood.
One stiff blind horse, his every bone a-stare,
Stood stupified, however he came there:
Thrust out past service from the devil's stud!

XIV
Alive? he might be dead for aught I knew,
With that red gaunt and colloped neck a-strain.
And shut eyes underneath the rusty mane;
Seldom went such grotesqueness with such woe;
I never saw a brute I hated so;
He must be wicked to deserve such pain.

XV
I shut my eyes and turned them on my heart,
As a man calls for wine before he fights,
I asked one draught of earlier, happier sights,
Ere fitly I could hope to play my part.
Think first, fight afterwards, the soldier's art:
One taste of the old time sets all to rights.

XVI
Not it! I fancied Cuthbert's reddening face
Beneath its garniture of curly gold,
Dear fellow, till I almost felt him fold
An arm to mine to fix me to the place,
The way he used. Alas, one night's disgrace!
Out went my heart's new fire and left it cold.

XVII
Giles then, the soul of honour - there he stands
Frank as ten years ago when knighted first,
What honest man should dare (he said) he durst.
Good - but the scene shifts - faugh! what hangman hands
Pin to his breast a parchment? His own bands
Read it. Poor traitor, spit upon and curst!

XVIII
Better this present than a past like that:
Back therefore to my darkening path again!
No sound, no sight as far as eye could strain.
Will the night send a howlet or a bat?
I asked: when something on the dismal flat
Came to arrest my thoughts and change their train.

XIX
A sudden little river crossed my path
As unexpected as a serpent comes.
No sluggish tide congenial to the glooms;
This, as it frothed by, might have been a bath
For the fiend's glowing hoof - to see the wrath
Of its black eddy bespate with flakes and spumes.

XX
So petty yet so spiteful! All along,
Low scrubby alders kneeled down over it;
Drenched willows flung them headlong in a fit
Of mute despair, a suicidal throng:
The river which had done them all the wrong,
Whate'er that was, rolled by, deterred no whit.

XXI
Which, while I forded - good saints, how I feared
To set my foot upon a dead man's cheek,
Each step, of feel the spear I thrust to seek
For hollows, tangled in his hair or beard!
- It may have been a water-rat I speared,
But, ugh! it sounded like a baby's shriek.

XXII
Glad was I when I reached the other bank.
Now for a better country. Vain presage!
Who were the strugglers, what war did they wage,
Whose savage trample thus could pad the dank
soil to a plash? Toads in a poisoned tank
Or wild cats in a red-hot iron cage -

XXIII
The fight must so have seemed in that fell cirque,
What penned them there, with all the plain to choose?
No footprint leading to that horrid mews,
None out of it. Mad brewage set to work
Their brains, no doubt, like galley-slaves the Turk
Pits for his pastime, Christians against Jews.

XXIV
And more than that - a furlong on - why, there!
What bad use was that engine for, that wheel,
Or brake, not wheel - that harrow fit to reel
Men's bodies out like silk? With all the air
Of Tophet's tool, on earth left unaware
Or brought to sharpen its rusty teeth of steel.

XXV
Then came a bit of stubbed ground, once a wood,
Next a marsh it would seem, and now mere earth
Desperate and done with; (so a fool finds mirth,
Makes a thing and then mars it, till his mood
Changes and off he goes!) within a rood -
Bog, clay and rubble, sand, and stark black dearth.

XXVI
Now blotches rankling, coloured gay and grim,
Now patches where some leanness of the soil's
Broke into moss, or substances like boils;
Then came some palsied oak, a cleft in him
Like a distorted mouth that splits its rim
Gaping at death, and dies while it recoils.

XXVII
And just as far as ever from the end!
Naught in the distance but the evening, naught
To point my footstep further! At the thought,
A great black bird, Apollyon's bosom friend,
Sailed past, not best his wide wing dragon-penned
That brushed my cap - perchance the guide I sought.

XXVIII
For, looking up, aware I somehow grew,
'Spite of the dusk, the plain had given place
All round to mountains - with such name to grace
Mere ugly heights and heaps now stolen in view.
How thus they had surprised me - solve it, you!
How to get from them was no clearer case.

XXIX
Yet half I seemed to recognise some trick
Of mischief happened to me, God knows when -
In a bad dream perhaps. Here ended, then
Progress this way. When, in the very nick
Of giving up, one time more, came a click
As when a trap shuts - you're inside the den.

XXX
Burningly it came on me all at once,
This was the place! those two hills on the right,
Crouched like two bulls locked horn in horn in fight;
While to the left a tall scalped mountain ... Dunce,
Dotard, a-dozing at the very nonce,
After a life spent training for the sight!

XXXI
What in the midst lay but the Tower itself?
The round squat turret, blind as the fool's heart,
Built of brown stone, without a counterpart
In the whole world. The tempest's mocking elf
Points to the shipman thus the unseen shelf
He strikes on, only when the timbers start.

XXXII
Not see? because of night perhaps? - why day
Came back again for that! before it left
The dying sunset kindled through a cleft:
The hills, like giants at a hunting, lay,
Chin upon hand, to see the game at bay, -
'Now stab and end the creature - to the heft!'

XXXIII
Not hear? When noise was everywhere! it tolled
Increasing like a bell. Names in my ears
Of all the lost adventurers, my peers -
How such a one was strong, and such was bold,
And such was fortunate, yet each of old
Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe of years.

XXXIV
There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met
To view the last of me, a living frame
For one more picture! In a sheet of flame
I saw them and I knew them all. And yet
Dauntless the slug-horn to my lips I set,
And blew. 'Childe Roland to the Dark Tower came.'




 
The Dark Tower thus far. Caution! Spoilers abound!
DT VI: Song of Susannah - June 2004 DT VII: The Dark Tower - November 2004
Timeline
1958 IT George Denborough gets killed.
1943 - A five year old Odetta Holmes has a brick dropped on her head by Jack Mort. This event creates Detta Walker although Detta takes control only one or two times until 1959
1959 Aug 19 Jack Mort pushes Odetta Holmes in front of a subway train, both her legs are amputated. It is this event that causes Detta Walker to become more dominant
1960 Events of "The Low Men in Yellow Coats", the novella in "Hearts in Atlantis".
1964 Roland enters the mind of Detta Walker while she is shoplifting in Macy's department store and brings her into his world
1977 May 9 Jake is pushed in front of a large Cadillac and killed. Before he dies he sees the image of The Man in Black dressed as a priest. He believes that TMIB pushed him in front of the car. This man is actually Jack Mort dressed as a priest and not the man in black after all .Jake Chambers is being the first time of twice entering into the world of the Dark Tower. Roland enters the body of Jack Mort, prevents Jake from being killed and is sent to the Gunslinger's world instead. , and gets enough of the anti-biotic Keflex to save his own life (as well as more ammunition than he has ever seen before in his life.) In the process Jack Mort is killed by the same train that maimed Odetta Holmes
1977 May 31 Jake begins to believe that he is going insane due to the same split time-line that affects Roland. In one reality he died, in another he didn't. Jake fully remembers both and that is tearing him apart. Jake skips school and finds an empty lot that once contained an "artistic deli". In the lot he finds a silver key and a rose growing in the middle of a clump of purple grass (see the note for Roland's meeting with Walter.) The rose opens and within Jake sees thousands of stars. He also buys a book from a man named "Tower", in this book is a train that bears a remarkable similarity to Blaine the Mono. This similarity leads Jake to believe that Blaine runs from St. Louis, MO to Topeka, KS.
1977 June Jake meets Eddie in a dream and is told to go to "co-op city" and find the young Eddie and Henry Dean. By following them he can find the gateway to the Gunslinger's world, which is actually contained within an ancient house thought to be haunted. Henry tells Eddie that two kids from Norwood Street had been found there with their throats cut and all the blood drained from their bodies and their hair had turned white. Eddie and Henry call the house "The Mansion", but there is reason to believe that at one point in the past it may have been called "The Markey Academy". This house is a living guardian between universes and it comes alive to prevent Jake from passing through. Naturally it fails.
1985 IT Adrian Mellon is the first victim of the 1985 wave of Killings in Derry.
1986 Captain Trips kills 99.6% of earth’s population in another universe, as described in the original The Stand, as well as in Wizard and Glass. This seems to be the world of the original Stand rather than the un-cut edition because the newspaper reports that the date is June 24, 1986. Reagan is still president and Bush is still V.P.
1986 June 24 Last issue of Topeka Capital-Journal The last issue of the Topeka Capital-Journal was printed in the where that The Gunslinger's Party visits in Wizard and Glass
1987 Roland enters the 21 year old body of Eddie Dean and helps him get a load of drugs through customs, gains a passing familiarity with antibiotics (enough to stay alive until a permanent cure for the lobstrosity bite is found), and rescues Eddie from a bloody shoot-out
1992 Captain Trips Captain Trips kills 99.6% of earth’s population in one universe (The Stand: Complete & Uncut).
1999 Susannah [Mia] arrives in NYC.
Roland’s TimeLine
300 or 400 B.C. book 3 time - A civil war erupted in a land called Garlan or in a place even farther away called Porla. Ripples of anarchy and rebellion spread out from this initial outbreak and caused almost every kingdom to fall. Huge, well-organized and well-trained armies broke apart into disorganized bands of bandits called "Harriers".Civil war erupts in a land called Garlan and in an even further away place named Porla.
20 years B.C.. book 3 time Communication between Lud and River Crossing stops.

David Quick attacks Lud.

Eldred Jonas fails as a Gunslinger and is sent West with a broken leg by Fardo, Cort's father.

Roland and Cuthbert plan a night of mischief in a cemetery, but Alain won't do it for fear of offending the spirits. Cuthbert makes fun of him saying ghosts don't really exist.

Something [bad] happens one day while Cuthbert and Alain are setting off fireworks.

A cross-eyed man tries to cheat Cort at the annual Fair-Day Riddling Competition by stealing the answers to the riddles. Cort stabs him in the chest with a knife and no one wins the prize goose.

Roland and Cuthbert overhear Hax's plans to poison the water supply of a town called Farson in the name of "The Good Man ". Hax is hung for treason. Roland is 11 years old.

1 year after Hax Steven learns of Gabrielle and Marten's affair.

2 yrs after Hax #4 Sylvia Pittson (the preacher in Tull) takes a trip through Hambry.

3 yrs after Hax #1 Roland almost catches Gabrielle and Marten in the act (I.159). A revolt is occurring in the West and the world has already "moved on." Roland defeats Cort with his hawk, David, and becomes the youngest Gunslinger ever. Roland is 14 years old. Right after his win, Roland goes to town and sleeps with a woman, a whore, for the first time. The next morning Steven confronts Roland over the whore's bed. He chastises Roland for allowing himself to be manipulated by Marten. Steven says he has known about Gabrielle and Marten for two years. Roland, Cuthbert, and Alain are sent to a town called Hambry in the barony of Mejis for their own safety from "The Good Man" and his rebellion against the Affiliation.

Within the space of a month Rhea of the Coös spies Roland and his ka-tet approaching Hambry. The night Roland arrives in Hambry Rhea meets with Susan Delgado and tests her virginity. She says that Susan may not lie with Mayor Thorin until Reap Night, three months away.

Later that night Roland and Susan meet along a deserted pathway. Roland (known to Susan as Will Dearborn) says that civil war has broken out in the Northern and Western baronies in the name of John Farson, "The Good Man."

One month after Cort's defeat .The reader learns that "Will Dearborn," "Richard Stockworth," and "Arthur Heath" are really Roland, Alain, and Cuthbert. Roland is not quite 15 years old at this point.

One week after the bar fight Sheemie delivers flowers to Susan from Roland

Three weeks after the bar fight. Susan has a fight with her Aunt Cordelia and goes riding to cool off. She runs into Roland. They kiss passionately and vow never to see each other again.

Susan gives her virginity to Roland.

Susan tells Roland the story of Oedipus and he relates it to "the bloody triangle formed by his father, his mother, and Marten".
Walter comes to Seafront and palavers with Jonas about his progress with Farson's orders.

Roland and Cuthbert kill Rhea's pet snake..

Latigo, the man Jonas was waiting for (Walter was an unpleasent surprise) arrives with 100 of Farson's men. They plan to kill Roland and his ka-tet the day before the reaping festival.

3 months since Rhea examined Susan. The Demon Moon, marking the start of reaping, rises...but rises blood red in color. Reynolds kills Rimmer. Depape kills Mayor Thorin and frames the three boys for the murders. Susan is burned alive during the Reaping Day festivities along with Roland's unborn child. Cordelia comes to her senses as she hears Susan's screams and dies of a heart attack before the flames are out. Roland, in an emotional collapse from seeing Susan's death in the Wizard's Glass, is returned home to Gilead with Cuthbert and Alain.

1 day before arriving home.Roland wakes from his stupor and see all the events of the past three months played in the Grapefruit...including those events which happened outside his presence.

3 days after arriving home. Roland gazes into the ball and manages to prevent (delay) his father's assasination. Roland gives the ball to his father and receives his father's sandal(iron)wood grip pistols.

Roland commits a matricide.

Graduation ceremonies take place.

9 wks after the graduation ceremonies, Cort dies (possibly poisoned)

Sheemie followed Roland, Cuthbert, and Alain home from Hambry and continues with them as they set off on their quest for the Tower along with Jamie DeCurry.

They see Dennis and Thomas chasing after Flagg (Eyes of the Dragon)

1 yr after defeating Cort (4 yrs since Hax) The Downland Baronies become overrun by riot and civil war. Less than 1 yr after the boys leave Hambry

Reynolds and Coral Thorin are killed in a failed bank robbery in a town called Oakley.

2 yrs after Cort dies The civil war which destroys the Gunslingers begins.

3 yrs after Steven is killed. Walter delivers Marten to Roland. (I.213)

10 yrs after Hax dies. The land falls to "The Good Man" Less than 1 year later

The events of The Little Sisters of Eluria take place.

Twelve years pass. Roland buys a mule in Pricetown Walter arrives in Tull and resurrects Nort.

Roland kills everyone in Tull to save his own life

Three weeks since Tull We meet Roland in the desert. He has been chasing the man in black for two months. Roland meets Brown and Zoltan, the mule dies.

16 days after meeting Brown, Roland meets Jake at the waystation

12 yrs since Gilead fell, (22 yrs since Hax, 12 yrs since Eluria) “The Gunslinger” book tells us that it has been 12 years since the destruction of the Gunslingers. While under the mountains, Jake asks Roland about growing up. Roland tells him of his various coming of age experiences. He says that he "left a girl [Jenna] twelve years ago

Later that day, Roland catches Walter. Roland is 33 years old. (Symbolically important since Roland becomes Walter's apotheosis at the same age Christ achieves his own.)

100 yrs (or more) later Roland awakens after the long palaver, he has physically aged only 10 years.
In Book 3 Roland says that after the meeting, Walter had been dead at least 100 years or more.


The events of The Drawing of the Three take place.

A few weeks later Roland, Suannah, and Eddie kill Mir.

Jake's drawing takes place.

Four days later Roland's ka-tet meets and is joined by Oy.


They come to the remains of David Quick and his downed WWII fighter jet.


They pass through River Crossing and the George Washington Bridge.


The action within the city of Lud takes place.


Richard Fannin (Flagg, Marten?) calls the Tick-Tock man into his service.

The ka-tet hop on board Blaine the mono.

The riddling begins.

We learn that Jake is eleven years old.


It is mentioned that Cort may have known (been aware) of other worlds...he knew a riddle by Jonathan Swift and that he was known to hold palaver with the Manni.


Roland says that Cuthbert died talking, and he fears the same for Eddie.


Eddie beats Blaine in the riddling competition.


They leave Blaine (after he/it crashes) and begin following interstate 70 South-East from Topeka.


Roland tells the story of Susan Delgado.

They come to the emerald palace.

They confront Flagg, who vanishes before Roland can kill him.

Roland takes Eddie, Jake, and Susannah inside the Wizard's Grapefruit and they watch him kill his mother.

They awaken from the pink once again along the path of the beam.

Book#5 The Pedddler Moon appears. It is late Summer.

Book #5 Jake and Eddie go Todash and travel to the New York of May 31st, 1977. Jake runs into himself and they witness Balazar confront Calvin Tower at "The Manhattan Restaurant of the Mind".

Book #5 The rest of Wolves of the Calla takes place.

Book #6 SPOILER! Susannah [Mia] arrives in NYC of 1999 18 years (years in our world) since Roland crossed the desert. Patrick Danville dies saving the lives of two men.

"Childe Roland to the Dark Tower Came" by Robert Browning (1812-1889) "Childe Roland" is a long narrative poem which tells the story of Roland, a knight in training, and his quest for the Dark Tower. King has said that "Childe Roland" was one of three factors that caused him to write The Dark Tower. The opening stanza of the poem is:

My first thought was, he lied in every word
That hoary cripple, with malicious eye
Askance to watch the working of his lie
On mine, and mouth scarce able to afford
Suppression of the glee that pursed and scored
Its edge, at one more victim gained thereby.

Hoary Cripple refers to Walter. The poem presents this person as a not quite evil, but rather meddling or mischievous person, who takes glee in causing trouble for others. During each of our encounters with Walter, King assigns him a special little personality quirk that constantly makes itself known — he titters. He has a very odd and peculiar laugh (and the smile of a dead man). Browning also pays unusual attention to the description of the hoary cripple's laugh and smile — the last three lines are devoted entirely to this detail. Another trait of this strange creature is his habit of lying to people just as Walter does to Roland for the first part of The Gunslinger and the Dark Man.

This poem is that it depicts the entire journey of Roland to the Dark Tower If King continues to draw inspiration from the poem, then maybe by studying the rest of it we can discover clues as to where King plans to take the story. At the end of the poem as Roland finally approaches the Tower he hears

Names in [his] ears of all the lost adventurers my peers

And along with the voices of his dead friends

There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met
to view the last of me, a living frame
For one more picture! in a sheet of flame
I saw them and I knew them all.

So, Roland will come to the Dark Tower and there waiting for him will be all of his dead friends and companions. However, unlike Browning's hero, Roland Deschain won't be able to set his slug-horn to his lips and announce victory. We learn in Wolves of the Calla that the Horn of Deschain was lost by Cuthbert at the battle of Jericho Hill.



"CHILDE ROLAND TO THE DARK TOWER CAME
by Robert Browning

(See Edgar's song in "LEAR")

I
My first thought was, he lied in every word,
That hoary cripple, with malicious eye
Askance to watch the workings of his lie
On mine, and mouth scarce able to afford
Suppression of the glee, that pursed and scored
Its edge, at one more victim gained thereby.

II
What else should he be set for, with his staff?
What, save to waylay with his lies, ensnare
All travellers who might find him posted there,
And ask the road? I guessed what skull-like laugh
Would break, what crutch 'gin write my epitaph
For pastime in the dusty thoroughfare.

III
If at his counsel I should turn aside
Into that ominous tract which, all agree,
Hides the Dark Tower. Yet acquiescingly
I did turn as he pointed, neither pride
Now hope rekindling at the end descried,
So much as gladness that some end might be.

IV
For, what with my whole world-wide wandering,
What with my search drawn out through years, my hope
Dwindled into a ghost not fit to cope
With that obstreperous joy success would bring,
I hardly tried now to rebuke the spring
My heart made, finding failure in its scope.

V
As when a sick man very near to death
Seems dead indeed, and feels begin and end
The tears and takes the farewell of each friend,
And hears one bit the other go, draw breath
Freelier outside, ('since all is o'er,' he saith
And the blow fallen no grieving can amend;')

VI
When some discuss if near the other graves
be room enough for this, and when a day
Suits best for carrying the corpse away,
With care about the banners, scarves and staves
And still the man hears all, and only craves
He may not shame such tender love and stay.

VII
Thus, I had so long suffered in this quest,
Heard failure prophesied so oft, been writ
So many times among 'The Band' to wit,
The knights who to the Dark Tower's search addressed
Their steps - that just to fail as they, seemed best,
And all the doubt was now - should I be fit?

VIII
So, quiet as despair I turned from him,
That hateful cripple, out of his highway
Into the path he pointed. All the day
Had been a dreary one at best, and dim
Was settling to its close, yet shot one grim
Red leer to see the plain catch its estray.

IX
For mark! No sooner was I fairly found
Pledged to the plain, after a pace or two,
Than, pausing to throw backwards a last view
O'er the safe road, 'twas gone; grey plain all round;
Nothing but plain to the horizon's bound.
I might go on, naught else remained to do.

X
So on I went. I think I never saw
Such starved ignoble nature; nothing throve:
For flowers - as well expect a cedar grove!
But cockle, spurge, according to their law
Might propagate their kind with none to awe,
You'd think; a burr had been a treasure trove.

XI
No! penury, inertness and grimace,
In some strange sort, were the land's portion. 'See
'Or shut your eyes,' said Nature peevishly,
'It nothing skills: I cannot help my case:
''Tis the Last Judgement's fire must cure this place
'Calcine its clods and set my prisoners free.'

XII
If there pushed any ragged thistle-stalk
Above its mates, the head was chopped, the bents
Were jealous else. What made those holes and rents
In the dock's harsh swarth leaves, bruised as to baulk
All hope of greenness? Tis a brute must walk
Pashing their life out, with a brute's intents.

XIII
As for the grass, it grew as scant as hair
In leprosy; thin dry blades pricked the mud
Which underneath looked kneaded up with blood.
One stiff blind horse, his every bone a-stare,
Stood stupified, however he came there:
Thrust out past service from the devil's stud!

XIV
Alive? he might be dead for aught I knew,
With that red gaunt and colloped neck a-strain.
And shut eyes underneath the rusty mane;
Seldom went such grotesqueness with such woe;
I never saw a brute I hated so;
He must be wicked to deserve such pain.

XV
I shut my eyes and turned them on my heart,
As a man calls for wine before he fights,
I asked one draught of earlier, happier sights,
Ere fitly I could hope to play my part.
Think first, fight afterwards, the soldier's art:
One taste of the old time sets all to rights.

XVI
Not it! I fancied Cuthbert's reddening face
Beneath its garniture of curly gold,
Dear fellow, till I almost felt him fold
An arm to mine to fix me to the place,
The way he used. Alas, one night's disgrace!
Out went my heart's new fire and left it cold.

XVII
Giles then, the soul of honour - there he stands
Frank as ten years ago when knighted first,
What honest man should dare (he said) he durst.
Good - but the scene shifts - faugh! what hangman hands
Pin to his breast a parchment? His own bands
Read it. Poor traitor, spit upon and curst!

XVIII
Better this present than a past like that:
Back therefore to my darkening path again!
No sound, no sight as far as eye could strain.
Will the night send a howlet or a bat?
I asked: when something on the dismal flat
Came to arrest my thoughts and change their train.

XIX
A sudden little river crossed my path
As unexpected as a serpent comes.
No sluggish tide congenial to the glooms;
This, as it frothed by, might have been a bath
For the fiend's glowing hoof - to see the wrath
Of its black eddy bespate with flakes and spumes.

XX
So petty yet so spiteful! All along,
Low scrubby alders kneeled down over it;
Drenched willows flung them headlong in a fit
Of mute despair, a suicidal throng:
The river which had done them all the wrong,
Whate'er that was, rolled by, deterred no whit.

XXI
Which, while I forded - good saints, how I feared
To set my foot upon a dead man's cheek,
Each step, of feel the spear I thrust to seek
For hollows, tangled in his hair or beard!
- It may have been a water-rat I speared,
But, ugh! it sounded like a baby's shriek.

XXII
Glad was I when I reached the other bank.
Now for a better country. Vain presage!
Who were the strugglers, what war did they wage,
Whose savage trample thus could pad the dank
soil to a plash? Toads in a poisoned tank
Or wild cats in a red-hot iron cage -

XXIII
The fight must so have seemed in that fell cirque,
What penned them there, with all the plain to choose?
No footprint leading to that horrid mews,
None out of it. Mad brewage set to work
Their brains, no doubt, like galley-slaves the Turk
Pits for his pastime, Christians against Jews.

XXIV
And more than that - a furlong on - why, there!
What bad use was that engine for, that wheel,
Or brake, not wheel - that harrow fit to reel
Men's bodies out like silk? With all the air
Of Tophet's tool, on earth left unaware
Or brought to sharpen its rusty teeth of steel.

XXV
Then came a bit of stubbed ground, once a wood,
Next a marsh it would seem, and now mere earth
Desperate and done with; (so a fool finds mirth,
Makes a thing and then mars it, till his mood
Changes and off he goes!) within a rood -
Bog, clay and rubble, sand, and stark black dearth.

XXVI
Now blotches rankling, coloured gay and grim,
Now patches where some leanness of the soil's
Broke into moss, or substances like boils;
Then came some palsied oak, a cleft in him
Like a distorted mouth that splits its rim
Gaping at death, and dies while it recoils.

XXVII
And just as far as ever from the end!
Naught in the distance but the evening, naught
To point my footstep further! At the thought,
A great black bird, Apollyon's bosom friend,
Sailed past, not best his wide wing dragon-penned
That brushed my cap - perchance the guide I sought.

XXVIII
For, looking up, aware I somehow grew,
'Spite of the dusk, the plain had given place
All round to mountains - with such name to grace
Mere ugly heights and heaps now stolen in view.
How thus they had surprised me - solve it, you!
How to get from them was no clearer case.

XXIX
Yet half I seemed to recognise some trick
Of mischief happened to me, God knows when -
In a bad dream perhaps. Here ended, then
Progress this way. When, in the very nick
Of giving up, one time more, came a click
As when a trap shuts - you're inside the den.

XXX
Burningly it came on me all at once,
This was the place! those two hills on the right,
Crouched like two bulls locked horn in horn in fight;
While to the left a tall scalped mountain ... Dunce,
Dotard, a-dozing at the very nonce,
After a life spent training for the sight!

XXXI
What in the midst lay but the Tower itself?
The round squat turret, blind as the fool's heart,
Built of brown stone, without a counterpart
In the whole world. The tempest's mocking elf
Points to the shipman thus the unseen shelf
He strikes on, only when the timbers start.

XXXII
Not see? because of night perhaps? - why day
Came back again for that! before it left
The dying sunset kindled through a cleft:
The hills, like giants at a hunting, lay,
Chin upon hand, to see the game at bay, -
'Now stab and end the creature - to the heft!'

XXXIII
Not hear? When noise was everywhere! it tolled
Increasing like a bell. Names in my ears
Of all the lost adventurers, my peers -
How such a one was strong, and such was bold,
And such was fortunate, yet each of old
Lost, lost! one moment knelled the woe of years.

XXXIV
There they stood, ranged along the hillsides, met
To view the last of me, a living frame
For one more picture! In a sheet of flame
I saw them and I knew them all. And yet
Dauntless the slug-horn to my lips I set,
And blew. 'Childe Roland to the Dark Tower came.'


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